Rules for the Investigator to Live By

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These are various rules that investigators should put into practice to improve the quality of their work. 

  1. You cannot cite the facts that support your opinion and ignore those that disprove it. A conclusive explanation must reasonably satisfy all known parameters of the event otherwise the explanation is conjecture and is inconclusive. Theories are fine but they should always be labeled and told as such.
  2. You can have bias and still be an objective investigator… How? The key to critical thinking is recognizing one’s own bias and being able to isolate that from an investigation. Bias can be a useful tool to generate hunches and break a case, but when analyzing whether a conclusion is conclusive, or digesting evidence, bias has no place.
  3. Hoaxes, incorrect identification, and exaggeration are always a concern. Identifying and understanding these elements is key to sorting out the credible evidence from the false positives.
  4. Paranormal events are not superficial and superficial answers will not yield truth. This is true for skeptics and believers alike who will jump to comfortable conclusions that support their deep-seated beliefs. As an investigator you should be quick to collect and analyze more evidence and slow to draw conclusions.
  5. In most paranormal occurrences something happened; there is some underlying reason for the reported phenomenon. What is important is to determine precisely why these results are occurring, not come up with why they could be occurring.
  6. Many past suspicious events will never be conclusively solved. As time goes on sources die and information disappears. Unless a new revelation is made, unanswered questions will remain unanswered. While we can speculate on what happened in the past we will never have the full scope of information and available evidence.

 

 

 

 

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